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I Was Here: A Look At Why We Create

Part of the Cave of the Hands in Santa Cruz, Argentina. ca. 9,300 BP

This article was published in the May 2015 issue of Nashville Arts Magazine

by Rachael McCampbell

It’s amazing to think that visual and sculptural arts were around almost 30,000 years before the first language was recorded. Humans have always possessed an inherent need to express ourselves through art. Before the majority of the world could read, or the invention of the printing press, visual art was often the platform used to illustrate stories and communicate ideas to the masses (think of medieval narrative paintings of Biblical stories by Cimabue and Giotto and, later, cartoons). Art commissioned by the Catholic Church lead to private commissions by wealthy patrons of portraits, neoclassical themes, and scenes of ordinary life. Romanticism of the late-eighteenth and the nineteenth centuries opened the doors for artists to express what they wanted to paint—their personal thoughts, observations, and feelings. This was a pivotal change that lead to all the “isms” and art movements we have today: Impressionism, Symbolism, Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Surrealism, Constructivism, Minimalism, Neo-expressionism, along with Installation, Performance, and Conceptual Art, to name a few. Continue reading I Was Here: A Look At Why We Create

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Long Live The Artist!

Anton Weiss at work in his studio. Photograph by Rachael McCampbell

This was published in the April 2015 issue of Nashville Arts Magazine

by Rachael McCampbell

I’ve heard it said that Picasso painted right up to his death at age 91. Since he began before his teens, that would constitute as a very long art career.

For most of us though, we have a good 4 to 6 decades to work. An exception being Grandma Moses, who began at 78, had her first exhibit at MoMA, and worked for over 2 decades—but I digress. The question is—how do we maintain long careers in the arts? Continue reading Long Live The Artist!

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And So It Goes… 

by Rachael McCampbell

(I first published this on my blog in 2015 under the title: “Are Artists Courageous or Crazy,” which was picked up by Nashville Arts Magazine and published as “And So it Goes…”. This then lead to a monthly column entitled, “And So It Goes…” about personal issues encountered in my life. I write about my own experiences as an artist and other artists’ lives as well.)


Are Artists Courageous or Crazy?

Imagine that you attend a job interview and they say, “You will work for six months on a project, pay for all the supplies, but not earn any money until the exhibit—that is—if you sell any of the products you make. And the place where you show your products—they will take 50 -60% of all the proceeds. You will also be required to work 60-hour weeks and almost every weekend. You will be the creative talent, marketing director, graphic designer, Webmaster, secretary/assistant, sales force, public speaker, framer, bookkeeper, maid, landscaper/gardener, cook and housekeeper. You will not get an IRA, nor any health care—no benefits at all, actually. Well, yes, one benefit. You will get to do what you really love to do—that is, make the product.” Continue reading And So It Goes…